The Economist Articles — Week of 27 Feb 2016

Every week I read through The Economist to pick out articles that may be useful for teaching in the classroom. I’ll be sharing some of my notes and the discussion prompts I’ve come up with in these weekly posts. For students, they can serve as guide-rails for your reading. For teachers, I hope they will be helpful for your teaching.

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How can I better prepare myself for the A level Economics Essay section?

I have written extensively about this in other sections of the blog, but just 5 quick tips that’ll get you there.
  1. Get exposure to many different types of questions and try to understand what each one requires.
  2. Thinking about how Economics is relevant to the real world. For example, why might some market structures be more suitable for certain industries? (in the sense that the outcomes are desirable to society.) Or for Macro — how does the US raising interest rates affect Singapore? How does the change in price of oil affect global trade and growth?
  3. Practice. Writing fast and also thinking fast.
  4. Learn how to critique your own work. Try peer assessment. Get your hands on good answer keys but don’t abuse them (i.e. don’t memorise full answers.)
  5. Choose the question wisely. I like to avoid 25 marks because they are less scaffolded. Also, just pick the ones you can answer, not the hard ones.

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SUPER evaluation

Do you always fail to acquire the elusive evaluation marks? Many JC students are unable to understand the demands of the markers when it comes to evaluation.  You will always see this vague statement of “able to challenge assumptions” in the mark scheme. What does it even mean? In the later part of my JC2 year, I found a framework for evaluation that works for almost all the essays. But first, let’s look at what evaluation really is.

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2013 A level H2 Economics Review: Microeconomics Qn 2

The Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) announced that prices of private residential properties in Singapore rose by 1.3% in the third quarter of 2011, but the rise in prices has been slowing for eight consecutive quarters. At the same time it reported that the total supply of new private residential properties nearing completion was at a record high.

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