Why I chose teaching & some thoughts on the flow state

When I was a student, I loved having eureka moments. I recall the many occasions in a classroom when a question that bugged me was finally resolved, the times when all of a sudden I understood a difficult concept upon hearing it being reexplained in a unique way, and the times when I came up with something that I thought was really interesting and shared it with others. These days we know the science behind such moments and why they feel so good; our brains release dopamine when we learn something new and exciting – it’s the same chemical that is released when advancing to the next level of a video game or hearing the coins in a slot machine. As educators, we are in the business of creating eureka moments. I see it as my goal to make learning as fun and as addictive as possible. I want to rekindle that flame of curiousity we all had when we were children, before anyone told us we should stop being so damn annoying by asking so many questions. Because ultimately, to create you’ve first got to be curious and there is nothing more meaningful than being in the business of developing creators who will one day shape the world we live in. As a teacher, I literally see myself as a kid who is just trying to find ways to engage and play with other kids; yes, what makes me tick is the thought of bringing out the kid in everyone.

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A poem by Glennice Harmon

They ask me why I teach
and I reply, “Where could I find more splendid company?”
There sits a statesman,
strong, unbiased, wise,
another later Webster
silver-tongued.
And there a doctor
whose quick, steady hand
can mend a bone or stem the lifeblood’s flow.
A builder sits beside him —
upward rise the arches of that church he builds wherein
that minister will speak the word of God,
and lead a stumbling soul to touch the Christ.

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The Answer to All Economics Questions

We all had a teacher who we will remember for life, be it for good or bad reasons.

For me, it is my economics teacher in JC1. He was a unique teacher who stuck to his own set of methods and style of instruction. Unfortunately, it was not a style favoured by some of his students and he was often misunderstood to be a bad teacher. In my opinion, he was simply different; he would used to come to class and rattle on about one of his stories about his daughter in UK, while weaving in explanations of economic concepts and his own opinions on current affairs; he never went through a single school tutorial worksheet during our tutorial sessions; he loved MCQs and would spend hours going through the questions because he believed that MCQs can bring about a strong fundamental understanding of the subject; he would send us emails with articles from The Economist and The Straits Times, often using these articles to illustrate key economic ideas.

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